Teen dating violence helpline

Posted by / 07-Oct-2020 11:59

That’s Not Cool addresses ways teens can work against dating abuse in their everyday actions.

The National Online Resource Center on Violence Against Women is a comprehensive and easily accessible online collection of full-text, searchable materials and resources on domestic violence, sexual violence and related issues.

Created from tragedy, Dating Abuse Stops Here, or DASH, was created to inspire and inform a community.

The site offers fact sheets, information, and resources about teen dating abuse to help teens, their parents and friends understand more about this growing problem.

Do you change your behaviour, your clothes, or avoid saying or doing certain things because you’re worried about how he’ll react? But remember – you don’t have to be hit to be abused.

If the answer to either of these questions is ‘yes’, your boyfriend is being abusive. Emotional, psychological and financial control are also very serious. What starts as name-calling and insults can turn into physical violence.

By contrast, boys are more likely to report experiencing less severe acts, such as being pinched, slapped, scratched or kicked.

Girls are more likely to report committing less serious forms of IPV, including as a means of self-defense, whereas boys are more likely to report committing more severe acts of IPV, including threats, physical violence and controlling a partner.

The police have a duty to investigate and keep you safe.

The literature on IPV among adolescents indicates that the rates are similar for the number of girls and boys in heterosexual relationships who report experiencing IPV, or that girls in heterosexual relationships are more likely than their male counterparts to report perpetrating IPV. stated that, unlike domestic violence in general, equal rates of IPV perpetration is a unique characteristic with regard adolescent dating violence, and that this is "perhaps because the period of adolescence, a special developmental state, is accompanied by sexual characteristics that are distinctly different from the characteristics of adult." Wekerle and Wolfe theorized that "a mutually coercive and violent dynamic may form during adolescence, a time when males and females are more equal on a physical level" and that this "physical equality allows girls to assert more power through physical violence than is possible for an adult female attacked by a fully physically mature man." Regarding studies that indicate that girls are as likely or more likely than boys to commit IPV, the authors emphasize that substantial differences exist between the genders, including that girls are significantly more likely than boys to report having experienced severe IPV, such as being threatened with a weapon, punched, strangled, beaten, burned, or raped, and are also substantially more likely than boys to need psychological help or experience physical injuries that require medical help for the abuse, and to report sexual violence as a part of dating violence.

They are also more likely to take IPV more seriously.

Abuse in teenage relationships is the same as abuse in older relationships – it’s all about one person trying to control and have power over someone else.

Ask yourself: do you feel frightened of your boyfriend?

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If any of the behaviours described below sound familiar, don’t worry – there is support available. Try and talk to someone you trust – perhaps a friend, teacher or parent.

One thought on “teen dating violence helpline”

  1. I've always wanted to be a sexy little doll, and now I get to be just that. I'm the type of girl you can bring home to your mom, but I'll blow you on the way there. I’m not necessarily looking for anything serious, and I’m not the marrying kind, though if we can be friends, awesome.